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After Syria, cholera spreads to Lebanon, prompting official assurances and anxieties.

The first case of cholera was reported by the Lebanese Ministry of Health on October 5 in the northern Akkar governorate, close to the Syrian border. Syria has been experiencing an unprecedented cholera outbreak in most of its governorates for more than a month.

According to Firas Al-Abyad, the Lebanese Minister of Health, this is the first instance to be reported in the nation in over 30 years; the previous incidence was documented in 1993.

This progression follows warnings from the World Health Organization.

After the cholera pandemic broke out, a “major danger in Syria and the area” was organised. We must act soon since the geography is concerning.

A bacteria that causes cholera may spread from person to person by contaminated hands, infected food, polluted water, contaminated vegetables, and contaminated water used to irrigate them.

The illness takes between two and five days to incubate. The most significant danger of the illness is dehydration of the body as a consequence of losing a significant quantity of fluid, which results in complications that may lead to death in the absence of treatment. Symptoms include frequent watery diarrhoea and vomiting.

was predicted

It is interesting that the case was recorded in the Akkar district and included a middle-aged Syrian refugee who acknowledged he was not living in Syria prior to his injuries.

According to the Minister of Health, who reassured that the surveillance team was prepared to conduct exams, track down his family and contacts, and determine whether there are new illnesses, and is presently under monitoring and his health is stable.

Two instances of cholera were registered among a group of displaced Syrians in Akkar, he continued, adding that “there are numerous suspicious cases and the requisite tests are being carried out to confirm them, knowing that these cases were tallied in anticipation of infection.”

, and it is probable that more incidents will be reported, “particularly given the large number.” Setting and shifting of borders for infected patients in Syria.

After the pandemic broke out in Syria and over ten thousand cases were reported, he noted that “the admission of cholera into Lebanon was a problem.”

According to contradicting reports from the regional civic groups and the Syrian regime’s Ministry of Health, the illness is experiencing a massive epidemic throughout Syria that has outpaced the capacity of local and regional communities to manage it.

response strategy

Representatives of international organisations, the Doctors Syndicate, the Nursing Syndicate, the Lebanese Society of Microbial Diseases, as well as those from the Ministry of Energy and Water, the Disaster Management Unit in the Council of Ministers, and the Red Cross attended a coordination meeting held by the Lebanese Minister of Health.

The cholera preparedness and response strategy for the Ministry of Health, which was created in conjunction with UNICEF and the World Health Organization and with the consent of all healthcare partners, was presented. The strategy entails:

  • In collaboration with the Ministry of Energy and Water, strengthening case investigation through field visits to all of Lebanon’s regions, particularly those where the number of cases is likely to rise. These visits will be used to inspect water sources, sewage networks, and conduct the necessary bacterial tests.

sending out circulars to hospitals, clinics, and medical personnel stressing the need of notifying the Ministry of any suspected or confirmed cases of infection.

obtaining a starter supply of the necessary drugs and vaccinations to treat injuries

In order to accommodate tests not only in the capital, Beirut, but also at other Lebanese provinces, as well as for offering tests to detect instances to ensure a prompt diagnosis, water testing facilities in 8 hospitals and laboratories were first activated.

supplying hospitals and isolation facilities with the necessary equipment to help limit the pandemic

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